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13

Jun

GPOYW. Or GPOYF*W (*feet).
Not pictured: Haglund’s deformity, but more on that in a moment.
Unlike the preferences of almost everyone in the world, but quite similar to my self-proclaimed alternate personality, Liz Lemon, I dislike wearing flip-flops. My feat feel dirty after 5 minutes of walking around the city in them, and I even live in a semi-clean city. On top of that, I get really cold feet. I don’t mean that figuratively, although at least one ex-boyfriend thought that it was a physical manifestation of figurative tendencies on my part. But I digress. I’m not a huge fan of flip-flops.
Despite this strongly held opinion, I have worn them almost every day for the past month. I usually would bite my weirdo tendencies and wear them for fashion’s sake 50% of the time, but I have been full-on flip-flopping for four weeks now. The reason: aforementioned Haglund’s deformity. Otherwise known as pump bump. Otherwise known as the HUGE bump on the back of my heel that can apparently cause ACHILLES TEARS (which has to be written in all caps because that’s just how much they scare me).
Up until now, the only “running” injury I’ve ever had was actually a skiing injury — I threw myself down a mountain in the Andes, insisting that skiing would just “come back to me,” and then continued to run 5-6 miles a day it because I didn’t want to go through the hassle of seeing a doctor while studying abroad. Because that made sense in my 20-year-old head. My knee hurts when it’s humid, but really it’s a totally manageable condition. ACHILLES TEARS, though, scare me in a way that I cannot ignore, and so I’m diligently following advice from various running blogs and websites, which means more time on the bike and lots of time wearing flip-flops. I know I’m just biding my time until I have to go see an actual, real doctor, which on student health insurance will surely involve jumping through epic hoops. But maybe, just maybe, flip-flops are actually the cure. I’m going to give it two more weeks, fully exposing my feet to the elements, just in case.

GPOYW. Or GPOYF*W (*feet).

Not pictured: Haglund’s deformity, but more on that in a moment.

Unlike the preferences of almost everyone in the world, but quite similar to my self-proclaimed alternate personality, Liz Lemon, I dislike wearing flip-flops. My feat feel dirty after 5 minutes of walking around the city in them, and I even live in a semi-clean city. On top of that, I get really cold feet. I don’t mean that figuratively, although at least one ex-boyfriend thought that it was a physical manifestation of figurative tendencies on my part. But I digress. I’m not a huge fan of flip-flops.

Despite this strongly held opinion, I have worn them almost every day for the past month. I usually would bite my weirdo tendencies and wear them for fashion’s sake 50% of the time, but I have been full-on flip-flopping for four weeks now. The reason: aforementioned Haglund’s deformity. Otherwise known as pump bump. Otherwise known as the HUGE bump on the back of my heel that can apparently cause ACHILLES TEARS (which has to be written in all caps because that’s just how much they scare me).

Up until now, the only “running” injury I’ve ever had was actually a skiing injury — I threw myself down a mountain in the Andes, insisting that skiing would just “come back to me,” and then continued to run 5-6 miles a day it because I didn’t want to go through the hassle of seeing a doctor while studying abroad. Because that made sense in my 20-year-old head. My knee hurts when it’s humid, but really it’s a totally manageable condition. ACHILLES TEARS, though, scare me in a way that I cannot ignore, and so I’m diligently following advice from various running blogs and websites, which means more time on the bike and lots of time wearing flip-flops. I know I’m just biding my time until I have to go see an actual, real doctor, which on student health insurance will surely involve jumping through epic hoops. But maybe, just maybe, flip-flops are actually the cure. I’m going to give it two more weeks, fully exposing my feet to the elements, just in case.